Difference between revisions of "XML"

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'''Extensible Markup Language (XML)''' became a W3C recommendation in February 1998, and has since become very popular for data exchange on the internet (see web service languages [[SOAP]] and [[WSDL]]).
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'''Extensible Markup Language (XML)''' became a W3C recommendation in February 1998, and has since become very popular for data exchange on the Internet (see web service languages [[SOAP]] and [[WSDL]]).
  
 
XML is a markup language similar to HTML, but unlike HTML, the author must write his own tags (often using a [[DTD]] or [[XSD]]). These XML tags describe data, instead of displaying it. Many of the languages created for use in the Semantic Web have been built on XML, so syntactical knowledge of XML is useful.
 
XML is a markup language similar to HTML, but unlike HTML, the author must write his own tags (often using a [[DTD]] or [[XSD]]). These XML tags describe data, instead of displaying it. Many of the languages created for use in the Semantic Web have been built on XML, so syntactical knowledge of XML is useful.
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==See also==
 
==See also==
  
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* [[XML Namespaces]]
 
* [http://www.w3.org/XML/ W3C's XML] A list of W3C's XML goings-on
 
* [http://www.w3.org/XML/ W3C's XML] A list of W3C's XML goings-on
 
* [http://java.sun.com/webservices/jaxp/dist/1.1/docs/tutorial/overview/1_xml.html Sun's Java XML Tutorial] A quick and simple introduction to XML. No Java required.
 
* [http://java.sun.com/webservices/jaxp/dist/1.1/docs/tutorial/overview/1_xml.html Sun's Java XML Tutorial] A quick and simple introduction to XML. No Java required.

Latest revision as of 16:25, 21 August 2006

Extensible Markup Language (XML) became a W3C recommendation in February 1998, and has since become very popular for data exchange on the Internet (see web service languages SOAP and WSDL).

XML is a markup language similar to HTML, but unlike HTML, the author must write his own tags (often using a DTD or XSD). These XML tags describe data, instead of displaying it. Many of the languages created for use in the Semantic Web have been built on XML, so syntactical knowledge of XML is useful.

See also