Difference between revisions of "X"

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* '''Native application(s):''' [[Native Application::Engineering Format Application Template]] - Graphic games
 
* '''Native application(s):''' [[Native Application::Engineering Format Application Template]] - Graphic games
  
* '''Interoperable applications:''' [[Interoperable Application::Engineering Format Application Template]] - Applications which can read or write files of this format, but are not native applications for the format.
+
* '''Interoperable applications:'''  
  
'''Magic numbers:''' [[Magic Numbers::]] - Unique identifying characters at the beginning of files for this engineering format.
+
'''Magic numbers:'''  
  
 
'''Format(s):''' [[Format::]] - .x
 
'''Format(s):''' [[Format::]] - .x

Latest revision as of 15:08, 22 May 2009

Title(s): -Direct3D model with .x files

Version ID: - Version 11

Date released: - July 2008

Date: - September 1995

Creator(s): Servan Keondjian

Contributor(s): - Microsoft, RenderMorphics Relationships: - In February 1995, Microsoft bought RenderMorphics and brought its CEO Keondjian on board to implement a 3D graphics engine for Windows 95. This resulted in the first version of Direct3D.

  • Previous Version(s): - Reality Lab
  • Contains: - .X files
  • Syntax Format(s): -Binary Encoding, Text Encoding, Templates
  • Family Format(s): - .x

Description: - X files provide a template-driven format that enables the storage of meshes, textures, animations, and user-definable objects. Support for animation sets enables you to store predefined paths for playback in real time. Instancing and hierarchies are also supported. Instancing enables multiple references to an object, such as a mesh, while storing its data only once per file. Hierarchies are used to express relationships between data records.

History: - In 1992, Servan Keondjian started a company named RenderMorphics, which developed a 3D graphics API named Reality Lab, which was used in medical imaging and CAD software. Two versions of this API were released. Microsoft bought RenderMorphics in February 1995, bringing Keondjian on board to implement a 3D graphics engine for Windows 95. This resulted in the first version of Direct3D that shipped in DirectX 2.0 and DirectX 3.0.

Example(s):

Drawing a triangle in Direct3D:

// A 3-vertex polygon definition
D3DLVERTEX v[3];
// Vertex established
v[0]=D3DLVERTEX( D3DVECTOR(0.f, 5.f, 10.f), 0x00FF0000, 0, 0, 0 );
// Vertex established
v[1]=D3DLVERTEX( D3DVECTOR(0.f, 5.f, 10.f), 0x0000FF00, 0, 0, 0 );
// Vertex established
v[2]=D3DLVERTEX( D3DVECTOR(0.f, 5.f, 10.f), 0x000000FF, 0, 0, 0 );
// Function call to draw the triangle
pDevice->DrawPrimitive( D3DPT_TRIANGLELIST, D3DFVF_LVERTEX, v, 3, 0 );

Identifier: http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/ocean-fog-using-direct3d-10/

Documentation: http://www.gamedev.net/reference/programming/features/d3do/page6.asp

File Extensions: - .x

Applications: - Windows versions such as vista, 98,...

  • Interoperable applications:

Magic numbers:

Format(s): - .x

Rights: Proprietary License

Sustainability Factors: - Facts about the sustainability of this particular engineering format.

  • Standardization: Used widely in game developing
  • Adoption: None
    • Licensing and patent claims: None
  • Self-documentation: None
  • External dependencies: None
  • Technical protection considerations: None

Typical use: CAD, Modeling, Rendering, Texturing, Animation

File classification: - Specific properties that pertain to this engineering format.

  • Type {Binary, Text}: Binary
  • Raster data: - Section describes whether or not the engineering format supports raster data.
    • Raster data 2D:
      • Is Supported: - Yes
      • Description: It support raster base on its rules. Rasterization rules define how vector data is mapped into raster data.
    • Raster data 3D:
      • Is Supported: Yes
      • Description: It support raster base on its rules. Rasterization rules define how vector data is mapped into raster data.
  • Geometric representation:
    • Implicit representation:
      • Implicit surfaces:
        • Is Supported: Yes
        • Description:
      • Implicit curves:
        • Is Supported: No
        • Description: N/A
      • Point set:
        • Is Supported: Yes
        • Description: Support for point sprites in Direct3D 9 enables the high-performance rendering of points (particle systems). Point sprites are generalizations of generic points that enable arbitrary shapes to be rendered as defined by textures.
    • Mesh:
      • Manifold surface meshes:
        • Is Supported: Yes
        • Description: None
      • Manifold volume meshes:
        • Is Supported: No
        • Description: None
      • Non-manifold meshes:
        • Is Supported: Yes
        • Description: None
    • Parametric representation:
      • Parametric surfaces:
        • Is Supported: Yes
        • Description: N/A
      • Parametric curves:
        • Is Supported: Yes
        • Description:
    • Contour sets:
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
    • NURBS:
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
  • Multi-resolution models:
    • Is Supported: Yes
    • Description: It support multi-resolution models and allow developer to specify resolutions as desired
  • Dynamics:
    • Kinematics:
      • Is Supported: Yes
      • Description: Developers can specify rotate degrees
    • Assembly:
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
    • Force(s):
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
  • Boundary representation
    • Manifold surface boundary representations:
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
    • Manifold volume boundary representations:
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
    • Non-manifold boundary representations:
      • Is Supported: No
      • Description: None
  • Material transparency:
    • Is Supported: Yes
    • Description: is one of the very important features of Direct3D, which uses the hardware support, if available. In case a hardware platform does not support a certain feature, Direct3D provides an equivalent implementation in software. This choice of using the hardware features if available, is transparent to the user. The application, at runtime can detect the hardware capabilities and use them if present

References: