Difference between revisions of "Group 32 - Kodak Funsaver Camera"

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(<b>Introduction</b>)
(<b>Executive Summary </b>)
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== <b>Executive Summary </b> ==
 
== <b>Executive Summary </b> ==
  
Our group was asked to analyze the Kodak Fun Saver single-use camera.  The main objectives of this project were to analyze the components of the camera, determine their functions, and suggest improvements that can be made to the camera.  Before anything else, we made some assumptions about the camera, including an estimation of the number of parts inside the camera, how the camera works, and if the camera worked at all.  Then we disassembled the camera piece by piece documenting our observations and took pictures of each part in order to keep track of all of them.  The approximate time for the disassembly process was about 1 hour, and was surprisingly easy because of the camera’s simple design.  The disassembly process helped us to understand what was inside of the camera, and allowed us to begin to understand each components function.  Also, we assumed what the manufacturing process involved in making each part was, based on any clues that we could find on the part.  Most of the parts were made of plastic and manufactured by injection molding.  Besides plastic, the other materials involved in the camera were metal and silicone.  The use of plastic and the minimum number of parts in the camera is what makes it inexpensive, recyclable, and lightweight, which makes the camera cheap for the consumer.  The reassembly process was easy given that we had all the pictures from the disassembly process.  The reassembly process took us less then 1 hour.  After becoming very familiar with the camera, we were able to come up with several possible improvements for the camera.  This was difficult, however, because Kodak has been manufacturing single-use cameras for over 20 years, and they have managed to cut down costs in a lot of ways, which is very apparent with their current design.
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    Our group was asked to analyze the Kodak Fun Saver single-use camera.  The main objectives of this project were to analyze the components of the camera, determine their functions, and suggest improvements that can be made to the camera.  Before anything else, we made some assumptions about the camera, including an estimation of the number of parts inside the camera, how the camera works, and if the camera worked at all.  Then we disassembled the camera piece by piece documenting our observations and took pictures of each part in order to keep track of all of them.  The approximate time for the disassembly process was about 1 hour, and was surprisingly easy because of the camera’s simple design.  The disassembly process helped us to understand what was inside of the camera, and allowed us to begin to understand each components function.  Also, we assumed what the manufacturing process involved in making each part was, based on any clues that we could find on the part.  Most of the parts were made of plastic and manufactured by injection molding.  Besides plastic, the other materials involved in the camera were metal and silicone.  The use of plastic and the minimum number of parts in the camera is what makes it inexpensive, recyclable, and lightweight, which makes the camera cheap for the consumer.  The reassembly process was easy given that we had all the pictures from the disassembly process.  The reassembly process took us less then 1 hour.  After becoming very familiar with the camera, we were able to come up with several possible improvements for the camera.  This was difficult, however, because Kodak has been manufacturing single-use cameras for over 20 years, and they have managed to cut down costs in a lot of ways, which is very apparent with their current design.
  
  

Revision as of 20:55, 7 December 2006

Kodak Funsaver Disposal Camera

Contents

Executive Summary

    Our group was asked to analyze the Kodak Fun Saver single-use camera.  The main objectives of this project were to analyze the components of the camera, determine their functions, and suggest improvements that can be made to the camera.  Before anything else, we made some assumptions about the camera, including an estimation of the number of parts inside the camera, how the camera works, and if the camera worked at all.  Then we disassembled the camera piece by piece documenting our observations and took pictures of each part in order to keep track of all of them.  The approximate time for the disassembly process was about 1 hour, and was surprisingly easy because of the camera’s simple design.  The disassembly process helped us to understand what was inside of the camera, and allowed us to begin to understand each components function.  Also, we assumed what the manufacturing process involved in making each part was, based on any clues that we could find on the part.  Most of the parts were made of plastic and manufactured by injection molding.  Besides plastic, the other materials involved in the camera were metal and silicone.  The use of plastic and the minimum number of parts in the camera is what makes it inexpensive, recyclable, and lightweight, which makes the camera cheap for the consumer.  The reassembly process was easy given that we had all the pictures from the disassembly process.  The reassembly process took us less then 1 hour.  After becoming very familiar with the camera, we were able to come up with several possible improvements for the camera.  This was difficult, however, because Kodak has been manufacturing single-use cameras for over 20 years, and they have managed to cut down costs in a lot of ways, which is very apparent with their current design.


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Introduction

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Research Members Brief Intro:


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Before Disassembly

Before Any Bad Things Happened
Photo Direction Image
Front
DSC01879.JPG
Back
DSC01880.JPG
Top
DSC01881.JPG
Bottom
DSC01882.JPG


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Disassembly Process

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Parts Analysis

Kodak Funsaver Disposable Camera Bill of Materials
Part # Part Name # Required Material Manufacturing Process Estimated Cost Image Before Image After Solo
1 Back cover 1 Plastic Injection molding
01a.JPG
01b.JPG
01c.JPG
2 Film spindal 1 Plastic Injection molding
02a.JPG
02b.JPG
02c.JPG
3 Film 1 Caseing is Plastic
03a.JPG
03b.JPG
03c.JPG
4 Battery 1 Caseing is metal
04a.JPG
04b.JPG
04c.JPG
5 Front cover 1 Plastic Injection molding
05a.JPG
05b.JPG
05c.JPG
6 Small spring 1 Copper
06a.JPG
06b.JPG
06c.JPG
7 Flash circuit 1 Silicone, solder
07a.JPG
07b.JPG
Front
07c1.JPG
Back
07c2.JPG
8 Viewfinder 1 Plastic Injection molding Front
08a3.JPG
Top
08a2.JPG
08b.JPG
08c.JPG
9 Lens holder 1 Plastic Injection molding
09a.JPG
09b.JPG
Error creating thumbnail: convert: Not a JPEG file: starts with 0x00 0x00 `/var/www/images/3/3e/09c.JPG' @ error/jpeg.c/EmitMessage/242.
convert: missing an image filename `/tmp/transform_71013dbe33f8-1.jpg' @ error/convert.c/ConvertImageCommand/3011.
10 Lens 1 Plastic
10a.JPG
10b.JPG
10c.JPG
11 Button 1 Plastic Injection molding
11a.JPG
11b.JPG
11c.JPG
12 Picture number gear 1 Plastic Injection molding
12a.JPG
12b.JPG
12c.JPG
13 Film advancing gear 1 Plastic Injection molding
13a.JPG
13b.JPG
13c.JPG
14 1 Plastic Injection molding
14a.JPG
14b.JPG
14c.JPG
15 1 Plastic Injection molding
15a.JPG
15b.JPG
15c.JPG
16 1 Plastic Injection molding
16a.JPG
16b.JPG
16c.JPG
17 1 Plastic Injection molding Front
17a2.JPG
Top
17a1.JPG
Error creating thumbnail: convert: Not a JPEG file: starts with 0x00 0x00 `/var/www/images/3/3e/17b.JPG' @ error/jpeg.c/EmitMessage/242.
convert: missing an image filename `/tmp/transform_54e47212f57e-1.jpg' @ error/convert.c/ConvertImageCommand/3011.
17c.JPG
18 Spring 1 Metal
18a.JPG
18b.JPG
File Lost
19 1 Plastic Injection molding
19a.JPG
19b.JPG
19c.JPG
20 1 Metal
20a.JPG
20b.JPG
20c.JPG
21 1 Metal
21a.JPG
Not Applicable Not Applicable
22 Central body 1 Plastic Injection molding Front
22a1.JPG
Back
22a2.JPG
Top
22a3.JPG
Bottom
22a4.JPG
Not Applicable Not Applicable


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Assembly Process

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What Can Be Improved On Our Model

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Other Models of Kodak Disposal

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Files

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Animation

3D Animation


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External Link

Competitors Model

Research group Of The Project - University At Buffalo

  • School Homepage[16]
  • Department of Mechnical and Aerospace Engineering[17]


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