Group 15 - Sony DVD Player

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Sony DVP NS-300 DVD/CD/VCD player

Contents

Executive Summary

Our project is the dissection of a Sony DVP NS-300 DVD/CD/VCD player. We disassembled the DVD player to discover the inner-workings of a generic household electronic item. Our goal was to learn more about all of the individual components as well how they are made and the materials of which they are made. Our DVD player is relatively basic compared to more modern players and only features the ability to play DVDs, and not the ability to record video or perform other functions. Everything is well-documented to enable anyone interested in the electro-mechanical aspects of the product to get a better comprehension of what this particular player has to offer. The project consisted of disassembling, analyzing parts/processes, replication in CAD, reassembly, and post-analysis. While the product given to us was non-functional we made some improvements and got it to work.

Introduction

General Information

Product type: DVD player
Product model: Sony DVP NS-300 DVD/CD/VCD
Project: Disassembly, analysis, and reassembly

Group 15 in action

Group Members

  • Nick Shaker: Group leader, presentation, write-up, disassembly, reassembly
  • Colin Lea: CAD models, write-up, disassembly, reassembly
  • Matt Humnicky: Presentation, write-up, disassembly
  • Nakul Roghelia: Write-up, disassembly
  • John Venturo: Write-up, dissassembly, reassembly

Before Disassembly Section

Our product is a Sony DVD player. It is in decent condition with a few plastic chips rattling around inside of the housing. Its purpose is to decode the information on properly formatted DVDs and send an output to a television. This product is not equipped to record (burn) DVDs or play VHS cassettes like other models available. This particular DVD player model is intended for personal home television use.

The DVD player plugs into a standard U.S. 120 volt wall outlet of alternating current. The chips inside run off of direct current and so a power converter must be included in the system. A DVD tray is intended to slide out of the player and so mechanical energy is used in our product. An electrical motor most likely powers this sliding motion.

To operate this product simply plug the power cord into an outlet and push the power button to its in position. Then press the open tray button, insert a DVD-rom and close the tray. Our DVD player currently does not work. The tray does not slide out to receive a DVD. While attempting to open, the DVD player will create a strange noise that sounds like the inner gears struggling against one another.

Judging from our basic understanding of circuitry and computers, there must be approximately nine (9) basic components that make this machine run. These components include housing, a audio/video integration chip, a processor, a tray with a tray mount, a reading lens, a button control chip (play, pause, stop, etc.), a power supply chip, and the wiring needed to connect everything. Other parts such as screws, resistors, and LED lights are also required in unknown quantities. The wiring is most likely constructed of copper. The housing itself is made of aluminum with a plastic front panel. The power/standby button is plastic, as well as the DVD tray and control buttons. LEDs are probably encased in glass. Wires, resistors, and small chips are all connected with solder. This totals 5 types of basic material all of which are used in many ways (ie copper: ribbon wires, circuit boards).

Disassembly Procedure

Step # Tool Used Difficulty Rating (1-5) Details
1 Phillips head 2 Unscrewed 2 rear external screws, 2 side screws (casing)
2 By hand 1 Slid casing (black, metallic) backward and off
3 Phillips head 2 Unscrewed rear screws to disconnect rear panel from circuit board (6 total)
4 Phillips head 2 Unscrewed rear screw to disconnect rear panel from bottom casing (1 total)
5 By hand 1 Disconnected power input (cord)
6 By hand 1 Removed rear panel
7 By hand 3 Removed front panel by disconnecting tray and green ribbon (snapped off sides)
8 Phillips head 2 Removed front tray frame by unscrewing 2 base screws
9 Phillips head 3 Unscrewed and removed tray-opening belt gear and belt
10 By hand 1 Removed tray-opening double gear (no screws)
11 Phillips head 2 Unscrewed small gold screws (PART#17)
12 Phillips head 2 Unscrewed 3 base screws (1 back, 2 sides) to unhook disc-reader
13 By hand 1 Disconnected 3 white, electronic ribbons to disconnect disc-reader mechanism
14 Phillips head 2 Unscrewed 3 screws (PART#21) to disconnect disc-reading laser (PART#22)
15 By hand 1 Unsnapped motor from underside of disc-reader (motor powers PART#15)
16 By hand 1 Unsnapped disc-elevator mechanism from disc-reader
17 By hand 2 Removed disc-elevator ramp from disc-reader

After Disassembly

Part Table

Part # Quantity Part Name Material Type Component Type Manufacturing Process Picture
1 3 External Back Screws Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW002.jpg
2 2 External Side Screws Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW003.jpg
3 1 Top Cover Stainless Steel Housing Sheet Metal Formed and Machined
CASE TOP004.jpg
4 4 Circuit Board to Back - Screws (long) Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW002.jpg
5 2 Circuit Board to Back - Screws (short) Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW003.jpg
6 1 Bottom to Back Screw Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW002.jpg
7 1 Back Piece Stainless Steel Housing Sheet Metal Formed and Machined
CASE BACK005.jpg
8 1 Power Cord Rubber, Stainless Steel, and Copper Power Transmission Extrusion, Sheet Metal Forming, Machining
POWER006.jpg
9 1 Front Panel Plastic Housing Injection Molding
CASE FRONT007.jpg
10 1 DVD Tray (snaps out of reader) Plastic DVD Interface Injection Molding
DISC TRAY008.jpg
11 2 Screws Attaching Front Tray Frame Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW009.jpg
12 1 Front Tray Frame Stainless Steel Frame Sheet Metal Formed and Machined
BRACKET010.jpg
13 1 Screw to Holster Opening Single Gear Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW011.jpg
14 1 Holster Opening Double Gear Plastic Gearing Injection Molding
GEAR012.jpg
15 1 Holster Opening Single Gear Plastic Gearing Injection Molding
GEAR013.jpg
16 1 Holster Opening Gear Belt Rubber Gearing Extrusion
BAND014.jpg
17 2 Front Left Screws (gold) (opposite side of 12) Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW015.jpg
18 1 Screw to Back of Disc Holster to Base Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW016.jpg
19 2 Screws to Sides of Disc Holster to Base Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREW018.jpg
20 1 Disc Holster Plastic Housing Injection Molding
FRAME022.jpg
21 3 Screws from Bottom of Disc Reader Stainless Steel Screw Machined
SCREWS LASER TRAY020.jpg
22 1 Disc Reading Laser Diode with CD Spinner Misc. Materials Information Decoder Injection Molding, Sheet Metal Forming, Machining, and Extrusion
LASER DIODE021.jpg
23 1 Motor to (#14) Misc. Materials Motor Injection Molding, Sheet Metal Forming, Machining, and Extrusion
MOTOR023.jpg
24 1 CD Reader Elevator Plastic Gearing Injection Molding
LASER TRAY019.jpg
25 1 Elevator Ramp Plastic Gearing Injection Molding
SLIDER024.jpg


26 10 Internal User Interface Buttons Plastic User Interface Injection Molding
FRONT028.jpg


27 1 PCB #1 Silicon and misc. Materials Microprocessor Injection Molding, Machining, and Extrusion
POWER TRIGGER025.jpg


28 1 PCB #2 Silicon and misc. Materials Microprocessor Injection Molding, Machining, and Extrusion
Chip 2.jpg


29 1 PCB #3 Silicon and misc. Materials Microprocessor Injection Molding, Machining, and Extrusion
CIRCUIT027.jpg


30 1 PCB #4 Silicon and misc. Materials Microprocessor Injection Molding, Machining, and Extrusion
AV CIRCUIT026.jpg


31 1 Base Panel Stainless Steel Housing and Support Sheet Metal Formed and Machined
Group15-Diss-33.jpg

Additional Part Information

1 - External back screws
Function - To hold the top cover (3) to the back piece (7)
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

2 - External side screws
Function - To hold the top cover (3) to the base of the DVD player and stop the Top from sliding off
Description -Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

3 - Top Cover
Function - To warehouse the electrical components and protect the system from external forces
Description - Black Smooth
This part is made out of stainless steel due to the greater forces that are applied to the top and sides of the product. The top cover is also an ideal piece for sheet metal manufacturing. This part was design to allow sufficient air flow and also look aesthetically pleasing to the user.

4 - Screws for the Circuit Board to Back (long)
Function - To connect the back piece (7) to the base of the DVD player
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

5 - Screws for the Circuit Board to Back (short)
Function - To connect the back piece (7) to the base of the DVD player
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

6 - Bottom to Back Screw (same as #4)
Function - To Connect the back piece (7) to the Bottom piece of the DVD player
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

7 - Back Piece
Function - To shield the components from dust and external forces from the back
Description - Non Shiny Metallic Color
The back piece was made out of stainless steel so that chipping of its structure (a prevalent problem with plastic) would not occur. Chipping and cracking might be incurred by the wires coming out of the back piece. This part looks as is does due to functionality. The designers wanted enough air flow through it to cool down the chips and were not overly concerned with how it looks because it faces away from the user.

8 - Power Cord
Function - Provides power from a 120 Volt wall source to the system
Description - Black Smooth
The power cord was made out of copper to provide a low resistance to the electrical current and wrapped in rubber because of its insulation properties. The power cord looks how it does mostly due to functionality. It has to be long enough to reach the wall outlet and thick enough to withstand shearing forces. It is black in color to be aesthetically pleasing.

9 - Front Panel
Function - To shield the components from dust and external forces from the front
Description - Black Smooth
The front panel was made out of plastic due to the ease of manufacturing and the low cost of materials. The front panel does not usually have to resist large shocks or forces. This part was designed to look appealing to the consumer while holding all of the required controls for the user interface. This piece has a good mix of functionality and a stylistic look.

10 - DVD Holster (snaps out of reader)
Function - Cradles the DVD disc and comes out of the DVD player to accept the DVD
Description - Black Smooth
The DVD holster was make out of plastic due to its low material cost and ease of manufacturing. Plastic is also softer than stainless steel and so has a lower likelihood of scratching the disc. The DVD holster must also appeal visually to the operator while having an important role in the system. The circular indents cradle the DVD disc to hold it in place.

11 - Screws Attaching Front Tray Frame
Function - To hold the front tray frame to the base
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

12 - Front Tray Frame
Function - Protects the tray and gearing system (14, 15, 16) from external forces and helps to keep the disc reader in place
Description - Non Shiny Metallic Color
The front tray frame was made out of stainless steel because it is a structural component that needs to have the strength to maintain its shape in order to protect the DVD holster. This part was made completely for functionality and looks as it does to properly protect the DVD holster.

13 - Screw to Holster Opening Mechanism
Function - Holds the holster opening gear system in place
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

14 - Holster Opening Double Gear
Function - Moves the DVD Tray out to accept the DVD and back in and also moves the Elevator Ramp in a translational path
Description - Black Smooth
This component was made out of plastic because of the relative ease of manufacturing and the low force levels exerted on it. This part looks the way it does due to how fast the designers wanted the DVD tray to slide in and out of the system.

15 - Holster Opening Single Gear
Function - Rotates with the holster opening gear belt (16) and transfers rotational energy to the holster opening double gear (14)
Description - Black Smooth
This component was made out of plastic because of the relative ease of manufacturing and the low force levels exerted on it. The holster opening single gear looks as it does due to functionality and how fast the designers wanted the DVD tray to slide in and out of the system.

16 - Holster Opening Gear Belt
Function - Transfers rotational movement from the motor (23) to the holster opening gear system (14, 15, 16)
Description - Black Smooth
This part was made out of rubber because of its requirement to easily stretch and bend large amounts that surpass plastic and metal's elastic limits. The gear belt was designed with a thickness large enough to resist the tensile forces and a length to wrap around the motor and the single gear.

17 - Front Left Screws (gold) (opposite side of 12)
Function - Pins the Holster Opening Single Gear (15) down in place which in turn holds the Holster Opening Double Dear (14) in place
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

18 - Screw to Back of Disc Reader to Base
Function - Connects the Disc Holster (20) to the base of the DVD player
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

19 - Screws to Sides of Disc Reader to Base
Function - Connects the Disc Holster (20) to the base of the DVD player
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

20 - Disc Reader
Function - Houses all components necessary for the holding and reading of the DVD disc
Description - Black Smooth
The disc reader is a complex piece that is not required to withstand large forces. For these reasons, plastic is ideal due to its ease of manufacturing. The looks of the disc reader were not important to the designers. What was important was that it was big enough to hold a DVD disc and small enough to fit into the housing while holding all of the mechanical components together.

21 - Screws (gold) from Bottom of Disc Reader
Function - Connects the Disc Reader Laser Diode with CD spinner (22) to the CD Reader Elevator
Description - Gold Color
This part was made out of stainless steel due to the strength and durability needed to hold components together. The screw was designed for functionality and sized according to how far the screw had to go in and what sizes were available to the designers.

22 - Disc Reader Laser Diode with CD Spinner
Function - Decodes the information from the DVD disc and sends it to the Digital to analog conversion system
Description - Black Smooth
The structure of this component is plastic due to the low force level applied to it. There are rubber stoppers at the screw in points to allow for slight motions to protect the laser diode. The disc reader laser diode with CD spinner looks as it does do to the functional need to rotate up about an axis high enough to lift up the DVD disc and spin it.

23 - Motor to (#14) from Plastic
Function - Moves the gears (14, 15, 16) which open and close the DVD Tray (10)
Description - Non Shiny Metallic Color
The motor was mostly made up of metal due to its electrical conductivity (inner sections of the motor) and structural strength (structural shell). There was also plastic pieces due to their abilities to deform momentarily to snap into place. The motor is compact to fit into a small space under the DVD reader. It has an rotating axle pointing up to spin the holster opening gear belt.

24 - CD Reader Elevator
Function - Raises Disc reader (22) into the center of the disc which elevates the DVD
Description - Black Smooth
This part was made out of plastic due to plastic's low cost and ease of manufacturing. The reader elevator is not subjected to large forces making plastic structurally sufficient. Functionality was the designer's only concern with this part. The CD reader elevator had to hold the laser diode and follow a path on the Elevator ramp to raise the DVD disc up.

25 - Elevator Ramp
Function - Provides a path for the CD Reader Elevator (24) to follow up to raise the disc and flips a switch to let the Motor (23) to (15) know when the tray is fully open or closed
Description - Black Smooth
This part was made out of plastic due to plastic's low cost and ease of manufacturing. The elevator ramp is not subjected to large forces making plastic structurally sufficient. This part looks as it does so as to provide a path for the CD reader elevator to follow. The elevator ramp also has a limb hanging out to flick a switch as it moves past it.

26 - Internal User Interface Buttons
Function - Provides a way for the user to interact with the DVD player
Description - Black Smooth
This part was made out of plastic due to its cheap cost and ease of manufacturing. The forces applied to the internal buttons amount to only minor finger depressions making plastic structurally viable. This part was made small to be out of the was of normal system operation but reachable if the user wanted to open the DVD player up and still operate the system.

27 - PCB #1
Function - Takes in the power and transfers it from alternating current to direct current
Description - Brown Color
PCB #1 is a combination of many materials but mainly of two layers. The top layer is copper and the bottom is a non conducting substrate. Its look and shape are purely for function.

28 - PCB #2
Function - Translates commands from the user interface into electronic signals
Description - Brown Color
PCB #2 is a combination of many materials but mainly of two layers. The top layer is copper and the bottom is a non conducting substrate. Its look and shape are purely for function.

29 - PCB #3
Function - Converts from digital to analog data and from analog to digital data
Description - Green Color
PCB #3 is a combination of many materials but mainly of two layers. The top layer is copper and the bottom is a non conducting substrate. Its look and shape are purely for function.

30 - PCB #4
Function - Prepares the data to be sent through the audio and video outputs
Description - Brown Color
PCB #4 is a combination of many materials but mainly of two layers. The top layer is copper and the bottom is a non conducting substrate. Its look and shape are purely for function.

31 - Base Panel
Function - Provides a base for the other components to be mounted off of and protects the inner components from external forces and dust.
Description - Non Shiny Metallic Color
The Base panel is made out of stainless steel because it needs to support the load of all the other components. The base is required to be sturdy and strong enough to screw components into. Its look is due to the needs of the parts that rest on top of it and connect to the base.

Component-level Changes

Plastic: The plastic on the casing broke off easily. To increase durability the unit could use a better, stronger type of plastic. When we received the DVD player there were already a few small plastic pieces laying in the case from the previous users.

Buttons: The buttons don't feel nice to push in. Buttons that activate on touch (something resistive to the touch from a hand) would create a more smooth operation.

There were a couple screws in the frame that seemed unnecessary.

We thought that overall individual components were well manufactured. Except for the plastic everything felt solid and in place.

CAD Drawings

Assembly
Whole G15.jpg
Frame Lift Disk Tray Gear Elevator Ramp
Frame G15.jpg
Lift G15.jpg
Disk tray G15.jpg
Gear G15.jpg
Slider G15.jpg


Assembly animation
<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/J7ivdWbJ4-c&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344" align = "center"></embed>


CAD models were created and rendered in Autodesk Inventor 2009. These models were then imported into Autodesk Viz for animation.


CAD files (must have Autodesk Inventor to view):

Frame

Lift

Disk Tray

Gear

Elevator Ramp

Assembly

Animation (must have Autodesk Viz)

Assembly Procedure

Step # Tool Used Difficulty Rating (1-5) Details
1 By hand 2 Inserted disc-elevator ramp into disc-reader/holster
2 Phillips head 2 Screwed disc-reader laser (PART#22) into disc-elevator
3 By hand 3 Snapped elevator into disc-reader/holster
4 By hand 1 Snapped motor to underside of disc-reader/holster
5 Phillips head 2 Screwed disc-reader/holster into base (1 back, 2 side screws)
6 By hand 1 Snapped 3 white electronic ribbons to connect disc-reader to base/PCB
7 Phillips head 2 Screwed in small gold screws (PART#17)
8 By hand 2 Put double-gear, belt, and single-gear into place on holster
9 Phillips head 2 Screwed in front tray frame (2 base screws)
10 By hand 1 Snapped front panel into place and connected electronic green ribbon
11 By hand 2 Slid in and snapped DVD tray into place
12 Phillips head 2 Screwed rear panel onto bottom casing and circuit board (7 screws total)
13 By hand 1 Connected power input (cord, snapped into place)
14 Phillips head 2 Slid top black casing forward into place, screwed in 2 rear screws, 2 side screws

After Assembly

Throughout this project we have learned in greater detail how the DVD player works. We learned there are actually 31 unique parts - much more than the 9 we predicted.
The DVD player works as following:

  • When the power pushbutton (7) is pressed electric power enters the unit from a 120V wall source, through the power cord and into the power supply board (1).
  • The power is distributed to each of the other circuit boards through metal contacts. It then charges all of the capacitors and other electrical components.
  • The tray (2) at the bottom holds the DVD. Beneath is a mechanism for opening the tray and the lens which reads the disc.
  • The thinner ribbon on the right sends information to the reader and the wider ribbon outputs the information.
  • Inputted information includes button triggers such as play/pause, stop, forward, and rewind that come from the inputs board (3).
  • The output information is sent to the audio/video board (5) where it can be outputting to a TV using component or composite cables.
  • The green PCB on the right (4) is mainly for digital to analog conversion. This deals with changing the digital signals to analog signals and transmitting them to the CD tray and then outputting them to the DAC again where the signals are converted and sent to the AV board.


Circuit1.jpg

Reassembly Procedure

Disassembly and reassembly basically use the same process and tools. During reassembly we combined a few of the later steps and swapped the order slightly. One of the advantages of this DVD player is its ease of deconstruction. There are multiple ways it can be put together or taken apart. Both procedures are straightforward and logical. We attached the DVD frame at slightly different point during reassembly. Everything can be taken apart using your hands and a screwdriver allowing for anyone to take it apart without special tools - this is what makes these processes so easy.

Fixes

When we got our product the DVD tray did not eject correctly. During disassembly we played around with the opening mechanism until we finally got it to run smoothly. The problem had to do with the alignment of parts. The elevator ramp was not sliding properly causing the tray not to eject or close when called. Normally, when the eject button is triggered, the motor spins a gear which moves the elevator ramp causing it to hit a lever. This lever causes the tray to stop moving. When we realigned the elevator ramp it accomplished this relieving our previous problem.

At the end of our reassembly we tested the DVD player with a DVD movie and it worked perfectly. We were afraid the laser diode might have been scratched in the process which could lead to problems reading the data. This was not the case.

Extra Information

DVD Disc (not included in device): The disc is made of a layer of plastic (PTFE) Aluminum, acrylic layer and a disc cover. The aluminum layer contains the data. Data is arranged in a spiral fashion starting from the center and moving outwards in the radial direction. In the spiral groove, the data is etched in the form of microscopic bumps where the data is stored.

DVD Disc Reader: Information is read from the disc as the motor spins. The motor spins based on the command received from the user. The command is relayed on to the motor using the printed circuit board (PCB) on to the right - the digital to analog converter (DAC). The motor itself receives power from the PCB on to the left. To enhance the life of the DVD player the laser diode must be stabilized.

Digital to Analog Conversion (DAC): This consists of resistors, capacitors and inductors. There are two ribbon wires connected to the DVD player, one for input other for the output. The output wire is the wider one. The last ribbon wire is connected to the audio/video board from where the DVD player can be connected to the TV. Separate microchips exist for the internal and external clocks on the DAC board. See the reference section for more information.

Electromagnetic (EM) Conversion: The capacitors store the energy and the arrangement of thermistors and inductors make sure that there is constant flow of charge.

Engineering Models

In the early stages of design for this product, graphical or semantic models could be used to explain the concept of what the final DVD player would look like. Using software such as CAD and Autodesk Inventor, engineers could graphically represent what each component of the player should look like. Through reports or write-ups, engineers would be able to convey ideas about the function of each component and also comment on the DVD player as a whole. In addition to graphical and semantic models, certain analytical/mathematical models could be employed. Three are listed below.

Circuit Models: Several models to technically explain the electronics inside the DVD player would be necessary to test (analytically) whether or not each circuit board or electronic component is able to function as intended. These models would include voltage, current, resistance and capacitance calculations, and would have to be precise.

Material Stress/Strain Models: Models to analytically determine what kinds of stress the casing of the DVD player could withstand would be necessary before the manufacturing process begins to ensure successful production. These models would include stress calculations at points in the housing where screws are used to connect components or other parts of the housing. The calculations would be effective as estimates, but the cost of more precise calculations may be worth the result of fewer faulty products.

Power Transmission Models: Since the motor (tray open/close) in the player is connected to an electrical power supply, these types of models could be used to mathematically test whether or not a specific voltage would overload the circuitry. These models would include many of the same calculations as the circuit models, but would be used to find the ideal way to power the electric motor (in which electrical energy is converted into mechanical energy). These calculations would have to be precise in order to inform the consumer of the limitations of the product.

Product-level changes

Circuit Boards: There is a lot of empty space caused by the layout of the circuit boards. We think that if the electrical engineering teams on the project worked together it would be possible to either create a single board for power, AV, and DAC or create them in shapes that come together better. It may also be possible to stack the boards on top of each other to reduce the length or depth of the DVD player.

One possible problem that could arise could be heat related; if the parts are close together there might be too much heat. This could be solved by adding a fan. The increased aesthetics may not outweigh the potential cost of the fan.

DVD slider mechanism: By increasing the gear ratio on the DVD tray opener/closer the tray could open and close faster. The motor appears to be powerful enough to accommodate this but it would need to be further tested.

Added functionality: Several other functions could be added to the current DVD player such as a DVD/VHS combo, a DVD recorder, or multi-disc tray. These would increase the cost but also be more appealing. At the time this DVD player was created people were still transitioning from VHS so many people would have found it useful. It was also the time that DVD recorders started appearing.

We realize that the 'added functionality' is somewhat separate from our discussion; a player with some of these functions would most likely co-exist with this player.


Company Recommendations

Design: The product could easily be more aesthetically pleasing if the space inside was better optimized (as discussed above).

Maintenance: The unit is well made and easy to access for maintainable purposes.

Recyclability: When the DVD player gets old enough people with probably through it in the garbage. The plastic components and computer chips do not biodegrade well and contain harmful materials. It would be a good initiative to have a buyback program where you can bring in your old DVD player for a new one at a slight discount. This would likely get more customers coming back because of the incentive and the company could dispose of the individual parts properly.

Conclusion

Throughout the dissection we learned the procedures it entails to create a consumer device such as our DVD player. We thought about the choices involved in fastening different parts such as the DVD drive frame, circuit boards, and casing. The project helped teach us the skills we need to think about manufacturing as well as team building. As an individual the whole project is somewhat daunting but when spread out over a team was manageable. The wiki made it easier for us to work on it individually regardless of time or location as well as concurrently at group meetings. The project was definitely beneficial to the way most of us view consumer product-based engineering firms

References

DAC Schematics - http://www.tnt-audio.com/clinica/convertus3_e.html
Basic INFORMATION - http://www.madehow.com/Volume-4/DVD-Player.html http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/dvd6.htm