Group 10 - GM V-6 Engine Gate1

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Contents

Gate 1: Request for Proposal

Work Proposal

Our task is to reverse engineer a GM V-6 engine. This entails disassembling the entire engine and analyzing all of the components. Our goal is to understand how and why the components were made the way they were.

Plan for Dissection

Our plan for dissection is to work from the top down. First by removing the throttle body and any pulleys, then disassembling the valve train while keeping everything very organized. Once the valve train is disassembled the heads and cylinders can be removed and then onto the pistons and crankshaft. Of course there are additional steps between these but this is the basic order we will be following. View the dissection link for more specifics.

Anticipated Tools Necessary:

  • Socket wrenches in a variety of sizes, as needed
  • Valve Spring compressor
  • Pry bar
  • Dead Blow Hammer, should force be needed for any disassembly
  • Torque wrench (reassembly)
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Snap ring pliers
  • Pulley Puller (for the harmonic balancer)
  • Piston Ring Compressor

Timeframe: Our group plans to meet in the dissection lab on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 6:30pm to 9:30 as needed. We have scheduled 3 weeks to dissect the engine. We anticipate dissection to take only one lab session, however documentation and taking picture will make make the dissection and reassembly last about three lab sessions, totaling about nine hours in the lab. Organizing information and data obtained in the lab will occur in separate group meetings outside the lab. Further details on the how much time we plan to spend on each stage can be obtained in the Gantt Chart.

Group Strengths

  • All the group members have experience disassembling products
  • Jim and Sam have experience working on gasoline engines
  • Jim and Jared also have two years of solid modeling experience and computer and technical skills

Group Weaknesses

  • 3 of the 5 group members have no experience taking apart gasoline engines

Challenges

  • Working with the other group to coordinate and communicate build time will pose a challenge.
  • Arranging meeting times between group members that live on campus and off. 

Management Proposal

In order to effectively and efficiently complete our task, we assigned roles to each of the group members, based on their strengths and the need for certain roles to be filled.

The purpose of this management proposal is to define roles, responsibilities, and availability for everyone, providing accountability.

Availability

All 5 group members are available on after 5:00 pm to work in the dissection lab. At least 1 group member is available for any given time that the dissection lab is open, should a group member need to be present to work with the other group. However we expect to dissect and reassembly the engine and collect the necessary data in the Tuesday and Wednesday lab sessions alone. Brief fifteen minute meetings will be held after lecture every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to discuss how each person's responsibility is going. Each group member will attend these meetings. Longer more in depth meetings will take place in Capen library every Sunday night to put parts of the gates together.

Roles and Responsibilities

JimProject Manager / Communication Liaison / Wiki DeveloperMakes sure the group stays on track and gets everything done by the deadlines. Coordinates everyone's schedule to meet as a group. Communicates with the other group, and makes sure no serious problems arise. Is the point of contact for Professor Cormier. Designs and updates wiki page.
SamDissection ManagerGuides dissection of the engine and figures out how best to deal with problems should they occur. Is in charge of the group when in the dissection lab.
JaredTechnical Expert / RecorderMakes solid models using AutoCad and documents data during dissection.
BenVideographerRecords dissection process and edits video. Creates time lapse footage for wiki site.
EdDissector / RecorderAssists in dissection and helps in documentation.

    All members will be working on the dissection in some way.

    Group Conflict Resolution Plan

    Group conflicts are expected to occur whether it is between the other group or within the group. Since two groups have to work on the engine, good communication between group leaders must occur. This is to ensure that parts or tools aren't missing and the needed data and notes can be obtained without getting in the way of each other. Ten people working one engine at once will be a problem. If problems come up between the other group, the group leaders will meet as soon as possible to resolve the issue. To resolve an inner group conflict, the group leader will be notified and at the next meeting the issue will be discussed and resolved.

    Gantt Chart

    Our progress will be tracked on the following chart:

    GanttChart.png
    Will be revised as due dates are given

    Gate 1: Request for Proposal

    Work Proposal

    Our task is to reverse engineer a GM V-6 engine. This entails disassembling the entire engine and analyzing all of the components. Our goal is to understand how and why the components were made the way they were.

    Plan for Dissection

    Our plan for dissection is to work from the top down. First by removing the throttle body and any pulleys, then disassembling the valve train while keeping everything very organized. Once the valve train is disassembled the heads and cylinders can be removed and then onto the pistons and crankshaft. Of course there are additional steps between these but this is the basic order we will be following. View the dissection link for more specifics.

    Anticipated Tools Necessary:

    • Socket wrenches in a variety of sizes, as needed
    • Valve Spring compressor
    • Pry bar
    • Dead Blow Hammer, should force be needed for any disassembly
    • Torque wrench (reassembly)
    • Needle nose pliers
    • Snap ring pliers
    • Pulley Puller (for the harmonic balancer)
    • Piston Ring Compressor

    Timeframe: Our group plans to meet in the dissection lab on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 6:30pm to 9:30 as needed. We have scheduled 3 weeks to dissect the engine. We anticipate dissection to take only one lab session, however documentation and taking picture will make make the dissection and reassembly last about three lab sessions, totaling about nine hours in the lab. Organizing information and data obtained in the lab will occur in separate group meetings outside the lab. Further details on the how much time we plan to spend on each stage can be obtained in the Gantt Chart.

    Group Strengths

    • All the group members have experience disassembling products
    • Jim and Sam have experience working on gasoline engines
    • Jim and Jared also have two years of solid modeling experience and computer and technical skills

    Group Weaknesses

    • 3 of the 5 group members have no experience taking apart gasoline engines

    Challenges

    • Working with the other group to coordinate and communicate build time will pose a challenge.
    • Arranging meeting times between group members that live on campus and off. 

    Management Proposal

    In order to effectively and efficiently complete our task, we assigned roles to each of the group members, based on their strengths and the need for certain roles to be filled.

    The purpose of this management proposal is to define roles, responsibilities, and availability for everyone, providing accountability.

    Availability

    All 5 group members are available on after 5:00 pm to work in the dissection lab. At least 1 group member is available for any given time that the dissection lab is open, should a group member need to be present to work with the other group. However we expect to dissect and reassembly the engine and collect the necessary data in the Tuesday and Wednesday lab sessions alone. Brief fifteen minute meetings will be held after lecture every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to discuss how each person's responsibility is going. Each group member will attend these meetings. Longer more in depth meetings will take place in Capen library every Sunday night to put parts of the gates together.

    Roles and Responsibilities

    JimProject Manager / Communication Liaison / Wiki DeveloperMakes sure the group stays on track and gets everything done by the deadlines. Coordinates everyone's schedule to meet as a group. Communicates with the other group, and makes sure no serious problems arise. Is the point of contact for Professor Cormier. Designs and updates wiki page.
    SamDissection ManagerGuides dissection of the engine and figures out how best to deal with problems should they occur. Is in charge of the group when in the dissection lab.
    JaredTechnical Expert / RecorderMakes solid models using AutoCad and documents data during dissection.
    BenVideographerRecords dissection process and edits video. Creates time lapse footage for wiki site.
    EdDissector / RecorderAssists in dissection and helps in documentation.

      All members will be working on the dissection in some way.

      Group Conflict Resolution Plan

      Group conflicts are expected to occur whether it is between the other group or within the group. Since two groups have to work on the engine, good communication between group leaders must occur. This is to ensure that parts or tools aren't missing and the needed data and notes can be obtained without getting in the way of each other. Ten people working one engine at once will be a problem. If problems come up between the other group, the group leaders will meet as soon as possible to resolve the issue. To resolve an inner group conflict, the group leader will be notified and at the next meeting the issue will be discussed and resolved.

      Gantt Chart

      Our progress will be tracked on the following chart:

      GanttChart.png
      Will be revised as due dates are given

      Product Archaeology: Preparation and Initial Assessment

      Development Profile

        General Motors first introduced the Vortec V6 engine in 1988. It was a 4.3L that was specifically designed to make a vortex within the combustion chamber to create a better air/fuel mixture. Due to the high manufacturing cost of GM’s earlier aluminum V8 engine, they designed this cheaper cast-iron V6 engine to produce similar power and performance. Using a cast-iron engine that gave customers the same satisfaction as the more expensive aluminum V8 saved GM a lot of money. When designing an engine, the main global concerns the must be considered are fuel efficiency and emissions. This engine is intended for use in a variety of vehicles, sold all over the world. It is intended that the consumer feels a lot of power produced by the engine. The consumer should also feel confident in the reliability of the engine.

      Usage Profile

        This product was intended to be used as powerplant in a variety of light duty vehicles, including the Chevrolet S10, Chevy Astro, and even certain Toyota Forklifts. This engine is used in vehicles, so it can be used professionally if a profession involves a lot of driving. It is most commonly used by the average consumer seeking transportation. As with any automobile engine, GM's V6 engine converts chemical energy in fuel to heat energy during combustion causing the gas inside the piston to expand. This expansion creates mechanical energy by pressing on the piston which then turns the crankshaft. This rotational energy is then harnessed by the transmission which then turns the wheels of a vehicle.

      Energy Profile

        Chemical energy is used from the fuel. Mechanical energy is used throughout the system. Translational energy is made by the pistons and then turned into rotational energy by the crankshaft. Energy is imported into the system via fuel lines. The engine takes chemical energy stored in the fuel and converts it to mechanical energy. Through the combustion of the fuel within the cylinder, the piston is forced down. The piston moves in a translational motion and since it is connected to a specifically designed crankshaft, the translational motion is converted to rotational motion. This rotational motion is used to power vehicles and other machinery.

      Complexity Profile

        There are roughly 150 components in the entire engine. Each component is very simple. The body of the engine is made of cast iron molds, the pistons are forged steel cylinders. Similarly to a typical engine, there are also Cam bearings and plugs, camshafts, connecting rod bearings, connecting rods, crankshafts, cylinder head gaskets, cylinder heads, dampers and pulleys, distributors, engine block exhaust values, flywheel, water pump, oil pump, head bolts and studs, ignitions systems, push-rod guide-plates, push-rods, rocker covers and gaskets, spark plug wires, valve lifters, and intake and exhaust manifolds. While the parts are very simple, they are made to a very specific tolerance so everything fits together perfectly. When fitted together into the final assembly, they create a complex system that outputs power to a driveshaft.[1] The component interactions are complex. There are many dependencies of components onto other components. Because of the high speeds involved in the motion of an engine, its components must relate perfectly to the connected pieces for successful operation of the engine. [2]

      Material Profile

        The engine is made up of a variety of materials. The main body of the engine, including the block and cylinder heads are cast iron. The pistons and other internal parts are forged steel, and outer hoses are a synthetic rubber. Since this is a lower end version of this engine by GM, most of the components are made of cast iron and steel. Higher end engines use aluminum components to save weight and increase performance. There also must be rubber o-rings throughout the engine for sealing components.

      User Interaction Profile

        Normally, the interface with an engine is very simple because it is installed in a vehicle. In our situation the engine is removed from a vehicle so the situation is very different. In a car the user just needs to insert a key into the ignition and turn it to "Start". This activates a starter motor on the flywheel which initiates the spinning action of the engine. All of these steps happen without any further user interaction. Once the engine is running, an accelerator pedal in the cabin of the vehicle is used to increase the fuel flow to the engine. This increases the speed of the engine and in turn the speed of the vehicle. The interface for the engine is very intuitive. Every car is made the same way, there is an accelerator, brake, and in standard transmission vehicles a clutch. The key also always functions the same way in every car. The key is inserted and then turned clockwise to start the engine. The positions for the key are labeled and should someone be unsure how to start the vehicle they could read the labels. Besides the act of actually driving, using an engine is very easy. The key is turned for a couple second until the engine starts, after that the engine keeps itself running. Regular maintenance is required for the engine to run properly for an extended period of time.
          Most of the maintenance is fairly easy and can be done by anyone with simple tools. The main thing that needs to be done is changing the motor oil. Over time this lubricant breaks down and can no longer provide proper protection to the components of the engine. To change the oil a drain plug is removed from the bottom of the oil pan, and the oil filter is replaced. Other maintenance can include checking the spark plugs and also air filter. This process is fairly simple but depending on the design of the engine, some parts can be hard to reach. A repair manual can be purchased at any auto parts store for roughly $20 which throughly explains all steps necessary to repair and maintain the vehicle.


        Product Alternative Profile[3]

          Alternatives are diesel, electric, and hydrogen power-plants. The engine we focused on is a GM built V-6, that model is just one of several decades worth of engines produced by GM. Many vehicles on the road today utilize GM built engines, such as Chevrolet's, Buicks, GMCs and Cadillacs. There are many other manufacturers of engines both here in the U.S. and throughout the world like BMWs and Hondas. Another alternative to be considered is how engines are powered. Gasoline powered engines have been the standard for almost a century though there are different methods of powering a vehicle as described earlier. GM itself has developed many potential models that use each other these different power-plants. In GM's lineup, there is a Chevy Equinox that uses Hydrogen Fuel Cells [4], the Chevy Volt, and many Chevy cars that run on E85, a blend of biodiesel and gasoline. [5]
            The main advantages to alternative powerplants are increase in mileage per resource and less of an impact on the environment. Recently, society has become aware of the negative impact that burning gasoline has on the environment. Electric vehicles use a battery to store electricity that when discharged, power electric motors that are more efficient than gasoline. Hydrogen has a high energy storage capactity and is readily available (with certain caveats). Biofuels come from renewable sources such as corn and usually have a higher octane rating than gas. The disadvantages of alternative powerplants is that currently there is no option that provides a direct and immediate replacement to gasoline engines. Reasons include a lack of infrastructure and the fact that the overall environmental impact is not an improvement. The biggest con is that gasoline is still the cheapest option for powering vehicles, and in order for the alternatives to compete, they have to be available at a competitive price.

          Biofuels have the most potential for quick replacement of gasoline. Already most gas stations distribute gasoline as a mixture with 10% ethanol, a corn derived biofuel. However, biofuels are still burned and release harmful gases. Biofuels are renewable but not without an environmental impact. Hydrogen Fuel cells are a poor alternative because of the difficulty in separating hydrogen from water, the danger of exploding fuel cells, and the lack of infrastructure (fueling stations and vehicles that support hydrogen). Electricity, though mostly produced from burning coal, outputs energy more efficiently than gasoline and has a well established infrastructure (almost every house in the US). The batteries that store charge can only provide between 25 to 200 miles of travel per charge, a factor that does not appeal to most buyers.

          Gasoline engines, because of the century of use and the cheapness of fuel are still the most cost effective powerplants. Biofuels are comparable in price and because they can be used in many diesel engines produce a small difference in cost. Electric powerplants are expensive to produce in terms of their motors and battery cells though electricity itself as a source of energy has a negligible price difference. Hydrogen has the biggest difference in price as every aspect of the system is expensive. The fuel cells are pricey and have to be built very carefully, and there is no environmentally friendly cost-effective way for separating hydrogen from oxygen in water (the electrolysis process). [6]

          References

          [1] "Chevy 90-Degree V6 Performance Parts from GM Parts Direct: Your Direct Source for Genuine GM Parts." GM Parts Direct: Your Direct Source for Genuine GM Parts. Web. 19 Dec. 2010. <http://www.gmpartsdirect.com/content/Chevy-90-Degree-V6-performance-parts.html>.

          [2] GM Parts Direct Catalog 2009. Sept 30. http://www.gmpartsdirect.com/performance_parts/GMPP_2009_Catalog.pdf

          [3] "GM - Vehicles - Innovation and Technology - Index." General Motors | GM.com. Web. 19 Dec. 2010. <http://www.gm.com/vehicles/innovation/>.

          [4] "GM - Technology - Fuel Efficient Car - Fuel Economy Car - Fuel Cell Car." General Motors | GM.com. Web. 19 Dec. 2010. <http://www.gm.com/vehicles/innovation/fuel-cells/>.

          [5] "GM - Technology - Biofuels." General Motors | GM.com. Web. 19 Dec. 2010. <http://www.gm.com/vehicles/innovation/biofuels/?deep=faq>.

          [6] Allen, By Mike. "Alternative Fuels to Gasoline - Cost of Alternative Fuels - Popular Mechanics." Automotive Care, Home Improvement, Tools, DIY Tips - Popular Mechanics. Web. 19 Dec. 2010. <http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/alternative-fuel/news/2690341>.


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