Gate 2 Content

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Contents

Gate Overview

In gate two we will be dissecting our Toro Snow blower while documenting and showing the appropriate steps as we go.

Project Management:

Preliminary Project Review:

From our previous plan of assessing the challenges as early as possible and solving conflicts as soon as possible is continuing to prove effective. Our team motto being “Plan the work, and work the plan,” is still very affective. At the beginning of this gate we had sat down and discussed what the roles are going to be through gate 3, which allowed us to pre-plan the work very assertively and delegate people to tasks, with checks and balances along the way so the work is being done in a timely and accurate manner. We as a group have continued to set internal deadlines with adequate time to correct/redo work as needed. This has proved itself correct in justifying team responsibilities and collaborative works for a team effort.

We as a group feel our plan is working. On the first gate we got all of our work done and to our Wiki designer only to realize we had left out a section. Because we finished everything early we had time to go back and catch and correct our missed section.

Specific Resolved Challenges:

Since gate 1 our group has lost 2 members bringing us down to only four. We lost our technical writer which has forcibly stepped up the need for us to work ahead of schedule and delegate more responsibility to the remaining members. We are finding the absence of these members very detrimental to the overall performance of our group, due to the outside workload brought in from their absence. But as in the working world, a group member may not be readily available if one gets fired, or quits, We have tried to make the best of the situation and be more organized with our group meetings. We are now meeting twice a week to discuss future plans and responsibilities.

Unresolved Challenges:

Our group challenges are still revolving around the class schedules of the individuals in the group, we are very rarely able to get all four of the remaining members into the same room at the same time for more than an hour, due to sporting events, extracurricular activities, or commuting issues. Another issue is being the 3D modeling which is in a later gate, we have already looked into the issue and assigned it to Joshua for researching a modeling program and means to render components in the program. We have lightened his load on this gate to make up for the long hours he is going to have to put in to resolve the lack of experience we all have in such field.

Complications in dissection:

During the dissection of the snow blower, we encountered stripped out screws, missing screws which were holding components on via zip ties, a missing belt from the belt drive, and cracked engine mount. These issues were resolved as we faced them. We are also as a group intending on replacing the missing screws (previously missing) and screws we were forced to bore out with the same size, and pattern screw that were previously installed by the manufacturer. Finally the last complication we encountered was due to our snow blower not being drained of its fluids. During transport of the unit, one of the member’s cars fell victim to these fluids. After dissection of the gas tank we properly disposed of the fluids to a small engine shop in the Amherst area.

Difficulty for the following steps are rated on a 1 to 5 scale. WIth 1 being easy and 5 being the most difficult. The rating system is only comparing the difficulty compared to other assembly steps. These ratings were coculated with taking into acount the time it took to assemble the part, the number of tools used, the force needed to put back together part and the amount thought needed.


Product Dissection

Difficulty for the following steps are rated on a 1 to 5 scale. WIth 1 being easy and 5 being the most difficult. The rating system is only comparing the difficulty compared to other assembly steps. These ratings were coculated with taking into acount the time it took to assemble the part, the number of tools used, the force needed to put back together part and the amount thought needed.


\'\'\'Table 3: Level Key\'\'\'
Level of Difficulty Explanation of Level
1-Minimal No Tools Required
2-Easy Single Tool Used
3-Moderate Two tools used, i.e. socket with wrench on nut
4-Some level of difficulty Two tools, with minimal work space to perform task
5-Not meant to be taken off Was unable to dissect without significant effort and elaborate means of craftsmanship


\'\'\'Table 4: Chute Assembly\'\'\'
Step # Picture (if applicable) Instructions of Dissection Level of Difficulty (from above provided chart) Tools used (size and quantity)
1
G24-1.jpg
Discharge chute housing, remove the (4)-9/16" carriage bolts that attach the chute to the outer shroud of the snow thrower 3 9/16" socket set, and 9/16" wrench
2
G24-1.jpg
Remove chute deflector from discharge chute, remove the (2)-7/16" carraige bolts 3 7/16" socket set and 7/16" wrench
3
G24-1.jpg
Dislodge the chute handle from the chute assembly 1 No Tools Required
4
G24-4.jpg
Chute retainer, unscrew the (2) 7/16" carraige botls, and remove chute detent spring from assembly. 3 7/16" socket set and 7/16" wrench
G24-3.jpg
after removal


\'\'\'Table 5: Handle Assembly\'\'\'
Step # Picture (if applicable) Instructions of Dissection Level of Difficulty (from above provided chart) Tools used (size and quantity)
5 Remove the (3) 7/16" carriage head bolts and locknuts at the base of the chute and lift off the chute assembly 3 7/16" socket set, and 7/16" wrench
6 Remove the (2) 3/8" bolts that hold the Bail to the Handle assembly 3 3/8" socket set and 3/8" wrench
7
G24-7.jpg
Remove rge (2) 7/16" bolts and nuts that hold the chute crank rod bracket to the lower handle and draw the rod out of the upper shroud 3 7/16" socket set and 7/16" wrench
8
G24-8.jpg
Remove the upper shroud by the (2) 7/16" bolts and locknuts in the front corners of the shroud 3 7/16" socket set and 7/16" wrench
9 Remove the (3) #2 screws that hold the faceplate to the control panel 2 Basic # 2 screwdriver
10
G24-32.jpg
Remove the gas cap, and lift shroud straight up, wiggling to dislodge it from its fit 1 No Tools Required
11 Remove the push nuts from the chute retainer and pull out the corresponding shaft 1 No Tools Required
12 Remove the chute seal from the chute retainer 1 No Tools Required
13 Dislodge the throttle cable from its housing on the pulley 1 No Tools Required


\'\'\'Table 6: Engine Removal\'\'\'
Step # Picture (if applicable) Instructions of Dissection Level of Difficulty (from above provided chart) Tools used (size and quantity)
14
G24-14.jpg
Remove the (4) 3/8" hexhead mounting screws 3 3/8" socket set and 3/8" wrench
15
G24-34.jpg
Disconnect the spark plug wire, using a spark plug adapter from the socket set. 2 Spark plug socket adapter
16
G33-33.jpg
Pull the rope assembly from the top of motor by (4) #4 allen keys, we were informed to tie a small knot in the rope before removal. 2 No Tools Required
17
G24-2.jpg
Remove the left side shroud, (our snowthrower had this component being held on by zip ties) 1 No Tools Required
18 Remove mounting bracket from engine compartment, this is done by the two 3/8" screws 2 Basic #2 screwdriver
19 Remove the self-retaining screws that hold the vane control rod, and secondly remove the muffler mounting nuts 2 Had to use a flat head screw drive to pry the screws out
20 Pull the engine up avoiding any obstacles 1 No Tools Required
21
G24-31.jpg
Dislodge the gas tank from its mount by flat head schrew driver, and unsnap the two push connections. (drain old fuel from tank, which will leak out of the compartment 1 Flat head screw driver
22 Remove the belt cover (2) 3/8\' bolts, belt, and engine pulley 3 3/8" socket set and 3/8" wrench
23 Remove the two hex head capscrews holding the lower shroud to the handles 2 3/8" socket set and 3/8" wrench
24
G24-28.jpg
Unhook the primer line 1 No Tools Required
25 With needle nose pliers remove the idler spring from the idler arm 1 Needle nose pliers
26 Using a 5/8" open end wrench and 1/2" socket remove the shoulder bolt, and nut from the retaining idler assembly to the left side of the plate 3 1/2" & 5/8" socket set and 1/2" & 5/8" wrench
27 Wedge a piece of blocking between the rotor assembly and the face housing to remove the rotor pulley. You can use a (1/2") long socket wrench for leverage to do so 5, due to the degree of effort to undo the bolt 1/2" socket and 1/2" wrench
28
G24-16.jpg
Remove the (4) 3/8" self tapping mounting screws from the engine shell 3 3/8" socket wrench
29
G24-15.jpg
Remove the (2) 7/16" bolts which is holding the exhaust to the engine 3 7/16" socket wrench
30
G24-17.jpg
For exposure to the piston, remove the (4) 7/64" Allen key bolts 2 7/64" Allen Key
31
G24-20.jpg
Use a 6.5mm socket to remove the (2) screws holding the magneto retainer wheel to the engine mount 2 6.5mm socket
32
G24-21.jpg
To remove the throttle housing, remove the (2) 7/64" Allen key bolts 2 7/64" Allen Key
33
G24-19.jpg
Remove the (5) Torx key socket for removal of cylinder head chamber 3 Torx key
34
G24-18.jpg
Remove the (2) 6.5mm screws on the Carburetor Assembly to expose the Carburetor throttle barrel 3 6.5mm socket
35
G24-36.jpg
By using a 4.5mm socket undo the two screws to loosen the shaft bearing 3 4.5mm Socket
36
G24-36.jpg
Using a hammer and appropriate force, force the piston out of the by bottom by striking it dead center of the piston 2 Hammer



\'\'\'Table 7: Rotor Assembly\'\'\'
Step # Picture (if applicable) Instructions of Dissection Level of Difficulty (from above provided chart) Tools used (size and quantity)
37
G24-6.jpg
Remove the (8) 7/16" bolts, (4) washers, and (8) locknuts that connect the rotor to the rotor shaft assembly 4, the bolts were very difficult to get to 7/16" socket set, and 7/16" wrench

While dissembling our snow blower we came to conclusion that every part was intended to be disassembled except for the removal of the piston. Although some where more difficult then others we were able to remove all the components. We came to the conclusion that the piston was not meant to be taken out because the structural integrity had to be degraded in order to remove the pushed bearing assembly.


Functional Model

Modelg24.png