Gate 2: Dissection

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Contents

Project Management: Preliminary Project Review

Cause for corrective action

Our dissection of the engine was a trying task and took all group members a significant amount of time to finish. Unfortunately, our outline did not work ideally, and we were met with a few challenges that prevented us from going about the dissection as we had originally planned. Although this shows a flaw in our first outline, it also highlights how our group was able work through these problems together, without letting them slow our dissection process. With this, we were still able to finish our work in an efficient and timely manor, while simultaneously learning the inner workings of a typical motorcycle engine. The following table shows the issues we met during the process, and how we decided to handle them in a way that would best benefit our project, and our group as a whole.

Table 2.1 Corrective Action
Issue Solution
Our group had to share the engine with another group.
  • Several members from each group would participate every time work was done on the engine in order to assure that both groups had knowledge of the entire dissection process.
Some tools were unavailable in the lab room.
  • This issue occurred several times. When we needed larger allan wrenches, we were able to utilizes supplies from the SAE club to solve this problem. The second time was when a tool was needed to remove clips holding gears in place. In the absence of the proper tool we improvised with screw drivers and a can opener.
Some group members had late night classes several times per week.
  • In order to accommodate conflicting schedules, we simply scheduled work times so only half of our group worked at a time in order to fairly distribute work.
Off Campus Group Member
  • One member of our group lived off campus and had to coordinate meeting times with available transportation. When this member was unavailable, he tackled parts of the project that could be done by one person

Product Archaeology: Product Dissection

Ease of Disassembly:

Diffictulty Scale

1-10

1-Part can simply be lifted out.

2-A small ammount force is necessary for one person to remove part.

3-A tool and a small amount of force is necessary for one person to remove part.

4-Multiple tools and a small amount of force is necessary for one person to remove part.

5-Tools and moderate force is necessary for one or more people to remove part.

6-Tools and moderate force is necessary for more than one person to remove part.

7-Tools and a significant force is necessary for more than one person to remove the part.

8-Advanced tools and a significant force is necessary for more than one person to remove the part.

9-Advanced tools, excessive force and multiple group members are necessary.

10-Multiple advanced tools, excessive force and multiple group members are necessary.

Dissection Process and Documentation

Step Component Description Difficulty Tools Meant to be disassembled Picture
1 Air Box Remove air cleaning housing cover, remove air filter 1 Philips head Screwdriver Yes, the air filter needs to be replaced over time
Airbox with housing cover removed
2 Air Box Separate carburetors from an air box 2 Hands NA
Carburator separated from airbox
3 Carburetors Remove seal between air box and carburetors 1 Hands No, carburetors are not meant to be fixed, only replaced
Step35.jpg
4 Carburetors Remove plastic caps on carburetors, pop out circular plastic caps on carburetors 3 Philips head screwdriver Yes, the caps are easy to reach and replace
Removing plastic caps from Carburetor
5 Carburetors Remove fuel intake line 3 Pliers Yes, the lines are simply taken apart and replaced
Disassembled fuel intake lines
6 Carburetors Detach metal casing opposite plastic caps 3 Philips head screwdriver Yes, the casings are easily removed and replaced
Metal casings behind plastic caps are being removed
7 Carburetors Remove throttle cable 4 Hands Yes, it is an integral component of the engine that is easily interchanged
8 Carburetors Undo 2 nuts on each side of the carburetor, remove carburetor connecting bolt 2 10 mm wrench NA
9 Carburetors Release springs and separate each carburetor 3 Philips head screwdriver Yes, because if one carburetor is broken, since they are so easily removed, you only need to replace that one, not all 4 [[
individual carburetors being disassembled
10 Cam Shaft/Chain Remove cam chain tensioner, two bolts 4 8 mm wrench Yes, it is needed to be removed to access the chain and other components
Cam shaft chain tensioner
11 Cam Shaft/Chain Remove bolts on cam sprockets, removal of cam sprockets 3 8 mm wrench Yes, necessary to be removed to access other components
12 Cam Shaft/Chain Slip out cam chain tensionor slider 1 Hands NA
13 Cam Shaft/Chain Removed cam shaft holder bolts on intake cam, lifted up intake cam to free cam, chain from gear 3 8 mm wrench Yes, the chain is needed to get the engine to turn over, so disassembly is necessary
14 Cam Shaft/Chain Pulled out cam chain 1 Hands NA
Cam shaft chain being removed
15 Cam Shaft/Chain Remove 8 bolts on exhaust cam cover using socket driver, remove exhaust cam 3 10 mm wrench Yes, needed to be removed to access the pistons
16 Cam Shaft/Chain Remove 10 head bolts, remove 2 auxiliary bolts holding head to block 3 8 mm allen wrench, 10 mm wrench Yes, needed to be removed to access the pistons
17 Cylinder Head Remove spark plugs 7 Pliers Yes, they are simple to remove and necessary for the engine to function correctly
Spark plugs being removed from the engine
18 Cylinder Head Remove radiator hose (previously cracked), remove cap and valve 3 Philips head screwdriver Yes, its a simple part to replace easy
Radiator hose being removed
19 Cylinder Head Remove left crankcase cover 3 Philips head screwdriver Yes, it is needed to prevent wear on the alternator, easy remove
Removing left crank case
20 Cylinder Head Remove oil pump 4 10 mm wrench No, it is difficult to replace, requires specific knowledge to remove
Removal of oil pump
21 Cylinder Head Remove starter motor 5 Hands Can be removed, but not meant to be disassembled, difficult to reconstruct
Starter motor resting on the engine
22 Clutch Remove clutch outer guide 7 Pliers No, because removal could seriously damage the function of the engine
Clutch outer guide
23 Clutch Spring removal 2 Hands No, the clutch is not meat to be taken apart
24 Clutch Clutch plate removal 2 Hands No, if the clutch were damaged, this would severely harm the working of the engine
Clutch plates being removed
25 Top Engine Block Remove oil pump sprocket 3 8 mm wrench No, this could seriously damage the engine
26 Top Engine Block Separate right crankcase 3 Philips head screwdriver Yes, it is needed to protect or get to other parts, so replacement would be necessary
Right crank case has been detached
27 Top Engine Block Remove gears from casing 2 Hands No, gears should never be removed if engine is to remain functional
Gears in their respective positions in the casing
28 Top Engine Block Remove connecting rod bearing caps 4 Hands NA
29 Top Engine Block Remove connecting rod caps 3 8 mm wrench NA
30 Top Engine Block Removed crank shaft 8 Hands No, it is an important part not meant to be taken apart
Crank shaft being taken out
31 Top Engine Block Remove pistons 6 Hands No, the pistons are not meant to be disassemble, and replacement would be very difficult
32 Top Engine Block Disassemble gears 10 Pliers, hands No, taking apart the gears is very tedious, and if harmed, the engine would not function
Disassembled gears
33 Bottom Engine Block Remove fork shaft, pull out shift forks 6 10 mm socket wrench Not meant to be removed
34 Bottom Engine Block Remove shift drum bearing set plate 5 10 mm socket wrench Not meant to be removed
35 Bottom Engine Block Remove shifter cam 5 6 mm socket wrench Not meant to be removed
Shifter cam
36 Bottom Engine Block Push out shift drum bearing, push out shift drum 4 Hands No, damage to this could severely damage function
Disassembled shift drum system
37 Bottom Engine Block Remove gear shift spindle assembly 5 Hands No, it is a very intricate piece which shoudl not be disassembled
Gear and spindle assembly
38 Bottom Engine Block Remove exhaust manifold 2 10 mm wrench Yes, it is external of the engine and can easily be modified
Exhaust manifold removed
39 Bottom Engine Block Remove oil pan 5 Philips head screwdriver Yes, it is needed to be removed to access the oil filter
OilPanToLC.jpg
40 Bottom Engine Block Remove oil filter 1 Hands Yes, it is needed to be replaced over time

Connection of Subsystems

Any product is a collection of different subsystems, with each subsystem containing its own set of subsystems all working together for a common goal. When considering the engine of the CBR 600, the primary function is conversion of chemical energy in gasoline into usable mechanical energy. The six major subsystems contributing to the whole are System Control, Intake, Energy Conversion, Transmission, Exhaust, and Lubrication and Cooling. Their relationships are outlined in

Funtional Diagram/Outline of Engine Functions